Body Tracing and the Soft Gaze by Rose-Mary Faulkner and Catherine Newton (EASS Award)

By , 14 August, 2017

SHOWING > 29 July – 20 August > Main Gallery

Body Tracing and the Soft Gaze seeks to map and record the surface, form, gesture, imprint and void of the body through the material qualities of glass.

Presenting the body from a subjective line of sight of her own form, Rose-Mary investigates ways to observe and experience the female figure, expressed visually through soft dappled imagery and subtle colour evocative of feeling and sensation. Catherine investigates the phenomenology of glass and how this medium can embody a sense of maternal love and intimacy through the act of hugging glass.

Bulge, Fold, Expand, Crease by Rose-Mary Faulkner

Rose-Mary Faulkner

Rose-Mary Faulkner graduated from the ANU School of Art with a Bachelor of Visual Arts (Glass) with honours in 2016. In her current work, utilising layers of abstracted photographic imagery and the material qualities of glass, Rose-Mary explores ways to analyse bodily form and surface.  Rose-Mary was a finalist in the 2016 Wagga Wagga National Emerging Glass Art Prize and her work exhibited in Fresh Glass at Canberra Glassworks. As part of the School of Art Emerging Artist Support Scheme she received residencies at Canberra Glassworks and Megalo Print Studio and Gallery for 2017.

The body is simultaneously familiar and foreign to us, it is with us always, yet we only ever have a restricted personal viewpoint of ourselves. My honours work presents a study of my own body from this unique and subjective line of sight as I aim to map and record the female figure through abstracted and layered photographic imagery in order to analyse form and surface. I investigate ways to observe and experience the body, expressed visually through soft dappled imagery and subtle colour evocative of feeling and sensation. My practice primarily explores decal imagery on glass. I firstly photograph sections of the body and abstract these images through digital manipulation. Transferring them to glass, I layer several related images before further manipulating the surface and form through multiple fusings or cold working. This expands the imagery beyond the original photograph as the transparency of glass enhances layering for the purpose of depth and overlapping, which enables me to utilize the specific materiality of glass to suggest bodily form. Through this work I am also able to consider the role of the gaze and express a female perspective on the female form.

Mum’s Hugs by Catherine Newton

Catherine Newton

I am a 2016 Honours graduate from the Australian National University School of Art. My current practice investigates the phenomenology of glass and how this medium can embody a sense of maternal love and intimacy. Scrutinising the materiality of glass, delving into its formal and metaphorical potential to convey the connection between mother and child through ideas of touch informed by psychological and theories of ‘nature versus nurture’. This current body of work involves mothers from our Canberra community. It celebrates and promotes the important role mothers have in today’s society. Mums’ Hug series 2 represents the physical and emotional connection of a mother and child through touch, specifically the act of hugging, the breath of the mother used to inflate the hot form. Exploiting the fluidity of hot glass at temperatures of between 700 and 800o Celsius, I dress myself in layers of heat resistant fabric -including a fireman’s suit- to perform the act of a hot glass hug. An analogy is drawn between hugging hot glass, intimidating and invigorating, and that of being a mum, which is also daunting and stimulating. The resultant textured, transparent sculptural forms sit on anthropomorphic plinths, representing maternal love and intimacy in the form of hot formed blown glass hugs. 

Of Surface and Form by Rose-Mary Faulkner